Acthar is indicated for the treatment of acute exacerbations of multiple sclerosis in adults.

Controlled clinical trials have shown Acthar to be effective in speeding the resolution of acute relapses of multiple sclerosis. However, there is no evidence that it affects the ultimate outcome or natural history of the disease.

Get Reimbursement Support and More

Questcor Is Committed to Helping You From Referral to Relief

If you and your doctor determine that Acthar is right for you, Questcor, the maker of Acthar, wants to make sure you have all the resources you need to get your prescription.

Once your doctor prescribes Acthar, you will automatically have access to the Acthar Support & Access Program (A.S.A.P.) . A.S.A.P. is available at no cost to you. It's made up of a team of professionals who are ready to guide you every step of the way. They offer:

Reimbursement and coverage support

  • Helps evaluate your insurance benefits
  • Assists healthcare providers with insurance prior authorization

Co-pay assistance and access programs

  • Works with your insurance company:
    • Coordinates financial assistance for uninsured or underinsured patients
    • A typical monthly co-pay is no more than $50 (as of January 2013)
    • Co-pay assistance is available for qualified patients who need it. If you qualify, you can get 100% co-pay assistance. To date we've provided more than $250 million in Acthar to patients in need (as of January 2013)

Medication shipment tracking

  • A.S.A.P. professionals coordinate with a Specialty Pharmacy to ensure delivery to your home as fast as possible
  • Handle tracking and delivery of Acthar to your home

Home Injection Training Services

  • Ordered by your doctor and chosen by you
  • Provides easy-to-use, home injection training materials
  • Coordinates a one-time Home Injection Training Service (HITS) by licensed nurses at no cost to you

Call A.S.A.P. at 1-888-435-2284 for questions about Acthar reimbursement or co-pay assistance.

Monday-Friday between 8 AM and 8 PM ET

Acthar is indicated for the treatment of acute exacerbations of multiple sclerosis in adults.

Controlled clinical trials have shown Acthar to be effective in speeding the resolution of acute relapses of multiple sclerosis. However, there is no evidence that it affects the ultimate outcome or natural history of the disease.

Download the Acthar for MS Relapses Brochure

Get more information about Acthar and treating MS relapses.

Download Now

Find Acthar Events in Your Community

See what Acthar events are happening near you.

See the Schedule

Find Acthar Events in Your Community

See what Acthar events are happening near you.

See the Schedule

Download the Acthar for MS Relapses Brochure

Get more information about Acthar and treating MS relapses.

Download Now

Important Safety Information

Patients, parents, and caregivers should be aware of the important information about H.P. Acthar® Gel.

Acthar should never be given intravenously (into a vein). Acthar should not be used in patients with a skin condition called scleroderma, bone density loss (osteoporosis), infection throughout the body, eye infection called ocular herpes simplex, recent surgery, history of or a current stomach ulcer, heart problems, high blood pressure, or allergy to pig-derived proteins. Tell your doctor about any health problems or medicines.

Acthar may cause side effects similar to side effects that happen due to treatment with steroid medicines. Not all of these side effects have occurred with Acthar, but they may occur. Acthar is a medicine that affects a patient’s immune system, and therefore patients may be more likely to get new infections, or inactive infections may become active. Acthar has effects on the adrenal gland. When a patient is taking Acthar, their adrenal gland may produce too much of a hormone called cortisol. This can cause symptoms of Cushing’s syndrome (upper body fat, rounded face, thin skin), which is more common in patients who take this medicine for a long time. When a patient stops taking Acthar after a long time, the body may not produce enough cortisol on its own (adrenal insufficiency). The doctor may prescribe a steroid medicine to protect the body until the adrenal gland recovers. Do not stop administering Acthar without talking to your doctor first. Your doctor may check your blood pressure during treatment and may instruct you to make some dietary changes. Patients should not receive certain vaccines during treatment with Acthar. Talk to your doctor about which vaccines are safe for use. Acthar may hide (or mask) symptoms of other conditions or diseases, and it may be more difficult for your doctor to diagnose other conditions or diseases in you or your child during treatment. The person receiving Acthar has an increased risk for bleeding from the stomach or having a stomach ulcer. Inform your doctor about any pain in the stomach area, bloody vomit, or bloody or black stools. While on Acthar, changes in mood and behavior such as irritability, depression, or trouble sleeping may occur.

Other side effects are possible. Acthar may make certain other medical conditions worse such as diabetes (may increase blood sugar); cause eye problems such as cataracts, increased pressure in the eye (glaucoma), and possible damage to the optic nerve; and cause allergic reactions to Acthar (seen as skin rash, swelling of the face, tongue, lips, or throat, and trouble breathing). Acthar may affect growth and physical development after long-term use. Long-term use of Acthar may cause an increase in the size of the heart, but this condition usually goes away after Acthar is stopped.

The most common side effects of Acthar in infants include infections, increased blood pressure, irritability and changes in behavior, changes in appetite and weight, diarrhea, and vomiting. Other adverse reactions reported in adults and children over 2 years of age included abdominal bloating, anxiety, asthma, chest discomfort, congestive heart failure, dizziness, shortness of breath, redness of the face, fluid retention, flushing, headache, injection site pain, tiredness, muscle weakness, nervousness, rapid heart rate, and lack of energy. Tell your doctor if there is any side effect that bothers you or your child or that does not go away.

These are not all of the possible side effects of Acthar. For more information, ask your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist, or call 1-800-465-9217. 1-800-465-9217. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. 1-800-FDA-1088.

For a full list of indications, contraindications, warnings, precautions, and adverse events related to Acthar, please refer to the full Prescribing Information.

Uses

H.P. Acthar® Gel (repository corticotropin injection) is an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) analogue used for:

  • Monotherapy treatment of infantile spasms in infants and children under 2 years of age.
  • The treatment of acute exacerbations of multiple sclerosis in adults.
  • Inducing a diuresis or a remission of proteinuria in the nephrotic syndrome without uremia of the idiopathic type or that due to lupus erythematosus.
  • The treatment of an exacerbation or as maintenance therapy in selected cases of systemic dermatomyositis (polymyositis).
  • The following: rheumatic disorders; collagen diseases; dermatologic diseases; allergic states; ophthalmic diseases; and respiratory diseases.

Important Safety Information

Patients, parents, and caregivers should be aware of the important information about H.P. Acthar® Gel.

Acthar should never be given intravenously (into a vein). Acthar should not be used in patients with a skin condition called scleroderma, bone density loss (osteoporosis), infection throughout the body, eye infection called ocular herpes simplex, recent surgery, history of or a current stomach ulcer, heart problems, high blood pressure, or allergy to pig-derived proteins. Tell your doctor about any health problems or medicines.

Acthar may cause side effects similar to side effects that happen due to treatment with steroid medicines. Not all of these side effects have occurred with Acthar, but they may occur. Acthar is a medicine that affects a patient's immune system, and therefore patients may be more likely to get new infections, or inactive infections may become active. Acthar has effects on the adrenal gland. When a patient is taking Acthar, their adrenal gland may produce too much of a hormone called cortisol. This can cause symptoms of Cushing's syndrome (upper body fat, rounded face, thin skin), which is more common in patients who take this medicine for a long time. When a patient stops taking Acthar after a long time, the body may not produce enough cortisol on its own (adrenal insufficiency). The doctor may prescribe a steroid medicine to protect the body until the adrenal gland recovers. Do not stop administering Acthar without talking to your doctor first. Your doctor may check your blood pressure during treatment and may instruct you to make some dietary changes. Patients should not receive certain vaccines during treatment with Acthar. Talk to your doctor about which vaccines are safe for use. Acthar may hide (or mask) symptoms of other conditions or diseases, and it may be more difficult for your doctor to diagnose other conditions or diseases in you or your child during treatment. The person receiving Acthar has an increased risk for bleeding from the stomach or having a stomach ulcer. Inform your doctor about any pain in the stomach area, bloody vomit, or bloody or black stools. While on Acthar, changes in mood and behavior such as irritability, depression, or trouble sleeping may occur.

Other side effects are possible. Acthar may make certain other medical conditions worse such as diabetes (may increase blood sugar); cause eye problems such as cataracts, increased pressure in the eye (glaucoma), and possible damage to the optic nerve; and cause allergic reactions to Acthar (seen as skin rash, swelling of the face, tongue, lips, or throat, and trouble breathing). Acthar may affect growth and physical development after long-term use. Long-term use of Acthar may cause an increase in the size of the heart, but this condition usually goes away after Acthar is stopped.

The most common side effects of Acthar in infants include infections, increased blood pressure, irritability and changes in behavior, changes in appetite and weight, diarrhea, and vomiting. Other adverse reactions reported in adults and children over 2 years of age included abdominal bloating, anxiety, asthma, chest discomfort, congestive heart failure, dizziness, shortness of breath, redness of the face, fluid retention, flushing, headache, injection site pain, tiredness, muscle weakness, nervousness, rapid heart rate, and lack of energy. Tell your doctor if there is any side effect that bothers you or your child or that does not go away.

These are not all of the possible side effects of Acthar. For more information, ask your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist, or call 1-800-465-9217. 1-800-465-9217.

For a full list of indications, contraindications, warnings, precautions, and adverse events related to Acthar, please refer to the full Prescribing Information.

Uses

H.P. Acthar® Gel (repository corticotropin injection) is an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) analogue used for:

  • Monotherapy treatment of infantile spasms in infants and children under 2 years of age.
  • The treatment of acute exacerbations of multiple sclerosis in adults.
  • Inducing a diuresis or a remission of proteinuria in the nephrotic syndrome without uremia of the idiopathic type or that due to lupus erythematosus.
  • The treatment of an exacerbation or as maintenance therapy in selected cases of systemic dermatomyositis (polymyositis).
  • The following: rheumatic disorders; collagen diseases; dermatologic diseases; allergic states; ophthalmic diseases; and respiratory diseases.